Dabbling in Happiness

I find life humbling in two ways: How simple the directions are to be happy, and how hard it is for me to follow them. Oh, and a third: How happy I am despite myself.

Wayne Calabrese color photo: Steve Roberts and the Johnson brothers
This recent photo with my grandsons reminds me
I find life humbling in two ways:
How simple the directions are to be happy
And how hard it is for me to follow them
Oh, and a third:
How happy I am despite myself. 

 

I’m always amused when someone calls me peaceful.  I used to think, sweetheart, take a breath.  Now I accept that I actually may be peaceful compared to somebody else in a given moment.  (I may be a singer compared to somebody else in a given moment, too, but that doesn’t make me Bruce.)  Plus what the heck.  We’re all each other’s teachers one way or another, and the universe sure has a sweet tooth for irony.  She doesn’t care how fast I’m dancing not to be a raving maniac.

Here are some of those simple directions I find so helpful…and ignore so often:

  1. Say yes with your whole heart, or say no.
  2. Be a citizen of the world. 
  3. Love the person in front of you.
  4. Compare yourself only to your own potential.
  5. Be responsible for your every thought, feeling and action.
  6. Make friends with death.
  7. Forgive everything.
  8. Consider all a gift to help you grow love.
  9. Solve every problem with the question, “Who am I?”
  10. Never be afraid to trade your cow for a handful of magic beans.*

I get lost in my fear; everyone is harmed.  Mercilessly self-judgmental my default reaction.  Now less.  Now less.  More kindness, forgiveness, more love of the mess.  Even dabbling in those simple directions seems like winning the lottery. 

*Tom Robbins

Comments

  1. Such wisdom in such a seemingly simple package… Seems I personally have the most trouble with #7.
    Thanks for the eloquent reminders!

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"I honor that we are killing the earth for the same reason I consider being an alcoholic a privilege: it is a doorway to the profound self-understanding required to make truly healthy choices."

The Essay: Honoring the Killing of the Earth